Ending the War in Business

ending the war in business

Many of us are familiar with the popular Showtime television series Billions. The show gives us a glimpse into the world of high-stakes financial asset management. Wall Street hero/anti-hero Bobby Axelrod will stop at nothing to achieve his goals while his antagonist, Chuck Rhodes a U.S. Attorney fueled by righteous indignation (and political ambition) stoops just as low in order to crush his nemesis. Both the main characters are portrayed as ruthless, power-hungry and successful in large part due to their killer instincts.  

While the series is a dramatization of real-life events and individuals, in reality business is often experienced as this kind of battleground, dog-eat-dog world where only the most ruthless survive.

In this article we examine the culture of business and the reasons business is so often seen as a battle. We discuss an alternative framework for operating in the world of commerce. We also highlight the many benefits of raising one’s love quotient and applying a heart-centered approach to business.

The Relationship between LQ and Vulnerability

For many, the idea of being vulnerable can cause fear or anxiety and in our society there can be a tendency to view vulnerability as a weakness. In this article we will show you how vulnerability can actually be a strength. We will discuss how loving yourself completely and deeply can help you feel safe enough to allow yourself to become more vulnerable.

The tendency to see vulnerability as a weakness is rooted in a reptilian survival response in the brain. We commonly refer to this survival mechanism as the fight-or-flight response. Fear triggers this fight-or-flight mode in-which vulnerability would be considered less than useful. When we perceive something as a “threat” and we are operating from this place of fear, vulnerability is typically viewed as a weakness. 

In ending the fight against life we shift our perspective from fighting against whatever it is we feel is attacking us to taking a stand for what we believe in. As we begin to infuse our bodies with love, it becomes easier to operate from the higher part of our brain know as the neocortex. In doing so, we begin to change our relationship with vulnerability. Vulnerability can now be more easily accessed. We become able to see it as a strength and it becomes something to embrace.

How LQ is Healing the Workplace

According to the Mayo Clinic the person you report to at work is more important to your health than your family doctor. Many of us are highly invested in our businesses, careers and jobs because we care about what we do. It is therefore natural to feel stressed when things don’t go well at work or in our businesses. However, when this type of stress in ongoing and gets worse over time, the impact it has on our health and relationships can be devastating.

What’s worse is that for many of us work related stress is a silent killer. It sneaks up on us. We don’t realize what a rut we’re in until it’s too late and one of the main reasons for this is that the bad habits and behaviors that lead to life-changing events such as death, divorce and illness have become normalized.

The modern workplace has become a breeding ground for bad habits leading to poor health and wellbeing for leaders, executives and employees alike. Some of the main issues are high stress/high conflict environments, micromanaging executives, unreasonably long work hours, a tendency to work after hours and work-related stress seeping into personal relationships.

The Link Between Autoimmune Disease & Love

Autoimmune Disease & Love

John Bates was the co-founder and face of a company which had raised $80 million in capital. In 2001, when the dot-com bubble burst the company’s investors backed out leaving him and his workforce unemployed and devastated. Bates felt like a failure and carried tons of guilt and shame. Shortly thereafter he contracted Stevens-Johnson disease, an autoimmune disease that nearly destroyed his life.

In this interview with John Bates he tells us how he overcame this debilitating illness and discusses the impact that meditation combined with the ‘I love you’ practice had on his recovery. In this article we will discuss some of the most important takeaways from Bates’ story and discuss the effect love, and increasing ones LQ, can have on the body and on autoimmune health in general. But first, let’s look at what an autoimmune disease is…

Ending the Fight Against Life

Ending the Fight Against Life

There is a prevalence of fight energy all around us. Many people tend to automatically step into fight mode when any type of challenge comes their way. Or they may go after problems they see in the world or life ready to take on a fight. This can be seen on all levels; among individuals, within families and communities and between countries. This way of acting originates from the most basic and instinctive part of our brains and the prevailing paradigm that we have to fight against whatever we see as an obstacle or challenge.

As we evolve on a conscious level individually and as a society this is something that we can expand beyond and let go of. When we have created a solid relationship with our emotions and when we feel safe enough in our own body’s we realize that we don’t have to operate in this fight-or-flight response in everyday life. In this article I will show you that through loving ourselves and by increasing our LQ we can become free from this limited way of interacting with life.

The Relationship Between LQ & Trust

Relationship Between LQ & Trust

Trust is a key element in business and in business relationships. For leaders in business, understanding the relationship between love and trust will help us to accelerate the power of trust in our lives and our organizations.

High trust relationships take time to build but once these are in place things can move very quickly. When we are coming from a loving place, when we have a high LQ, trust can actually be developed much more quickly because our intent, who we are, can be felt and trusted.

Trust is one of the most elusive qualities of our time and yet it is one of the most crucial. Stephen R. Covey said that “Trust is the glue of life. It’s the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships.”

IQ, EQ & LQ-What Do They Mean and How Are They Related?

IQ, EQ & LQ
We know that IQ is a measure of intelligence fully rooted in the mind and has, for many years, been used as a predictor of future success. EQ, which speaks to emotional intelligence, is one’s ability to understand the motivations and feelings of others and to be guided by this knowledge in our interactions with them. It is also widely believed that while IQ is set, EQ can be developed.

Understanding LQ as it relates to IQ and EQ is simple. LQ refers to the intelligence of the heart. It is one’s ability to be kind and compassionate to self and others. LQ begins where EQ ends. It is the next evolutionary step in the intelligence paradigm and in some ways LQ may be more important to our development than either EQ or IQ.

If someone has a low IQ, or a low EQ, they can still learn to love themselves and in turn to be more kind and loving to others. We all know of that one person in our lives, who is not book smart, or street smart but has a heart of gold.

Improving Your LQ Through the ‘I Love You’ Practice

‘I Love You’ PracticeFor centuries we have known that there is power in language. The need to connect is as old as humanity itself. Early humans communicated through sign language and documented their histories through cave paintings, sculptures and basic images. The need to name things, places, actions and emotions led to the development of first spoken and then written language. In fact, all systems from the simplest to the most complex require a codified language.

We know that there is power in words. Words can be used to instruct, explain, defend, condemn, heal or destroy and of all the phrases available to us, there is probably none more meaningful, than the phrase ‘I love you’. We say this to our parents, to our children to our spouses and friends but how often do we say ‘I love you’ to ourselves? So often in life we are taught the power of loving others and doing kind things and paying it forward but we are not really taught to love ourselves.